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Chrysler LHS

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The Chrysler LHS was introduced in 1994, a year after the Concorde on a stretched LH body (the "LHS" name comes from LH-Stretched). The LHS was introduced alongside the latest (and last) car to utilize the New Yorker nameplate. The first generation LHS would go until the end of 1997, and the second generation would be short-lived, running from 1999 to 2001 (there would be no 1998 LHS). Where applicable, this page covers both the LHS and New Yorker except where noted.

Here's a rundown on both models:

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Chrysler LHS
Chrysler Corporation
Production 1994-1997
Class Full-Size
Body Style 4-Door Sedan
Length 207.4"
Width 74.4"
Height 55.7"
Wheelbase 113"
Weight 3500-3700 lbs
Transmission 4-Speed Automatic, FWD
Engine 3.5L (215 cid) V6
Power 214 hp
Similar Chrysler New Yorker
Platform LH

1st Generation LHS (1994-1997)

Both the LHS and New Yorker rode the same 113" wheelbase as the the Concorde, but measured 6" longer overall. Aside from the LHS having front bucket seats and the New Yorker having a 3-place bench seat, they were pretty much identical internally and externally. Standard and only engine was a 214 hp 3.5L (215 cid) V6 with a 4-speed automatic. Naturally, most power options were either standard or available, even including variable-assist power steering. The LHS and New Yorker shared the Concorde's new "cab-forward" design, and they handled and drove like the bigger Concordes that they were, which wasn't a bad thing. 1995 models added a cancel feature to their cruise control.

1996 models had a new radio antenna incorporated into the rear window and a couple of new colors, but the big news was the final cancellation (in name only) of the New Yorker model at the end of 1996, which had been in use at Chrysler since 1939, making it one of America's longest running nameplates (and certainly became one of Chrysler's most overused nameplates in the 1980s). Whether or not Chrysler did an injustice to the New Yorker name by letting it quietly die after being in use for 58 straight model years is subject to personal interpretation... but even though the name was no more, the car that held the name carried on into 1997 with no appreciable changes.


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Chrysler LHS
DaimlerChrysler
Production 1999-2001
Class Full-Size
Body Style 4-Door Sedan
Length 207.7"
Width 74.4"
Height 56"
Wheelbase 113"
Weight 3500-3700 lbs
Transmission 4-Speed Automatic, FWD
Engine 3.5L (215 cid) V6
Power 253 hp
Similar Chrysler 300M
Chrysler Concorde
Dodge Intrepid
Platform LH

2nd Generation (1999-2001)

The LH platform (Concorde, Intrepid) had been redesigned for 1998, and the 2nd generation LHS would debut a few months later as an early 1999 model to coincide with the introduction of the all-new 300M. In fact, by this time, the LHS had basically become a Concorde with a different nose. The LHS and 300M would share the same chassis and running gear, but the LHS was the more sedate of the two, as the 300M was geared more to the sport-oriented crowd with a sport-tuned suspension and tires, along with an "autostick" transmission, which permitted manually-selected gear changes using a separate shift gate. Standard and only engine was a 253 hp 3.5L (215 cid) V6 with a 4-speed automatic transmission. The LHS also had a different grille and taillights than the 300M (and was a full 10" longer), along with a little more chrome and glitz.

2000 models changed very little - chrome power window and door lock switches and a new 4-disc CD-changer became available, but that was about it. 2001 models got new steering wheels with audio controls and a 3-point safety belt for the middle rear position, along with optional side-impact airbags. An optional Luxury Group became available, featuring a California Walnut-trimmed interior, automatic adjusting outside mirrors and an overhead console-mounted Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC). 2001 turned out the be the LHS's last, as it was clearly being overshadowed by the much more popular 300M, which continued through 2004. There was no direct successor to the LHS, but in 2002, a new top of the line Concorde Limited model was introduced that had the looks of the LHS with its grille, taillights and other unique trim.

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