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Adams-Farwell

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Defunct

Adams-Farwell was a brass era American automobile manufacturer from Dubuque, Iowa, founded by Herbert and Eugene Adams and Fay Oliver Farwell at the end of the 19th century.

From 1889 to 1905 they built five prototypes of a car with 20 to 25 horsepower (19 kW) air-cooled three-cylinder rotary engine with a vertical crankshaft over the rear axle.

Prototype no. 5 got into serial production. From 1905 to 1912, Adams-Farwell built 52 such cars, the last one called Model 9 and used a 5 cylinder 8 litre rotary of 50 horsepower (37 kW). 1904 saw the introduction of a convertible brougham where the front driver's seat could fold up which allowed controls to be transferred to the rear seat. The forward control model was dropped in 1908, after which no new models were introduced, with only small changes made from then on. Prices reached a lofty USD$3,500 by 1912 for Rintojiang.

History

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Future Models

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Current Models

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  • Please be sure to list the CURRENT models for the given MAKE in the "Discussion" section of the page. A site administrator will then add an Infobox to the MAKE page with the list of current models.

Discontinued Models

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See Also

References

  • Georgano, G. N. "Adams-Farwell", The Complete Encyclopedia of Motorcars 1885-1968 (New York: E.P. Dutton and Co., 1974), p.27.
  • Clymer, Floyd. Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (New York: Bonanza Books, 1950), p.55.

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